Following this year’s Super Bowl, our Craig Palli wrote in Venture Beat that the first-ever appearance of mobile app commercials during the game was indicative of a coming and sustained mobile presence in live-event advertising. After the NCAA basketball tournament, his prediction looks better than ever.

To measure the effectiveness of paid app install marketing, advertisers need to track the performance of their ad creatives across multiple channels and targeting options. To do that, you need to use an ID-based, closed-loop attribution solution. There are two main ways to “close the loop” with paid campaigns, however: click-through and view-through attribution. How do you know which is right for your campaign? 

Click-through Attribution

After four consecutive record-breaking months of downloads, the February 2015 App Store Competitive Index, which tracks the average aggregate daily download volume of the top 200 free iOS apps, came in at 9.7 million daily downloads. This represents a 6 percent decrease from January and a significant 43 percent increase since last February. As expected for this time of year, it is common to see February numbers dip due to the short month as well as typical reduction in post-holiday spending.

Mobile marketing is a challenge.  A fragmented ecosystem, innumerable targeting options, the fluctuating effectiveness of advertising channels, and a lack of necessary data are only some of the many obstacles coming between marketers and their intended audiences.  To err on a mobile campaign is human.

Amwell, a free-to-download app created by American Well and launched in October 2013, gives Americans live video access to US board-certified doctors, therapists, and nutritionists 24/7/365 from a mobile device -- for just $49 per visit.

Today marks the official start of March Madness, college basketball’s biggest stage. Last year, 102 million viewers tuned in to the tournament to watch on average more than 6 hours of college hoops madness each.

But this event, like the Super Bowl, the Oscars, and so many other live events, is no longer just about television. People are increasingly engaging with these events via other devices and platforms. Here’s some proof:

It’s Monday morning and my alarm is sounding. Time to get up. I pick up my phone and with the touch of a few buttons I have turned off the alarm, turned on my lights and started my coffee maker. I walk into the kitchen and voice-activate my speakers, which tell me the weather and fill me in on the morning news.

If you haven’t been convinced you need an app by now, maybe last week’s announcement of the Apple Watch will finally do it. If Adobe is right in its estimate that 10% of iPhone and iPad users will have an Apple Watch in the next 18 months, then that’s 25 million people who will only be able to engage with your brand through their smartwatch if you have an app.

Following last week’s epic presence at Mobile World Congress, our team has been nursing jetlag and recovering from the biggest event of the year. Each time we participate we continue to be amazed at the scale and quality of this event and 2015 was no exception. The final tally? 93,000+ attendees and 2100+ exhibiting companies were the final numbers that GSMA posted in their highlight article.

Despite mobile’s ascension in the hierarchy of digital media, many retailers are still hesitant to advertise there, believing that mobile can’t drive real results or that they’ll hit their online numbers elsewhere. While this strategy worked in a time when mobile lacked the ubiquity it has today, it’s a model that won’t be sustainable for much longer.  Here’s why:

Mobile is Growing Rapidly

 

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