Retargeting and remarketing are two terms that we often see used synonymously and interchangeably. Both refer to the act of re-engaging people who are already in your funnel. Distinctions are often drawn in other channels like desktop, where retargeting may mean serving display ads to someone who has visited your site and remarketing can mean following up with an email.

For the purposes of mobile user acquisition, it’s time to draw some clear distinctions:

Everywhere you turn someone is on a mobile device. Whether they’re in their living room, riding a subway, or even walking down the street, all eyes are laser focused on the smartphone in their hands that can connect them to the rest of the world.

And that means with each and every passing second, as more and more actions are taken on those mobile devices, more and more mobile data is being collected. Data which, thanks to the mobile ID, is more reliable, and more personal than ever before.

Thus we have the mobile advantage.

Audioboom, a London-based podcast network, allows users to listen to, record and share sound files via desktop and mobile app. The company has more than 4 million registered users worldwide.

Scotts, long synonymous with lawn care has also been trying to become synonymous with mobile. The well-established brand refreshed their mobile app earlier this year, and turned to Fiksu to help them promote it. The app provides all kinds of advice and guidance on how to grow a beautiful lawn, including when to buy lawn care products like fertilizer and weed control.

We are thrilled to share the news that for the second year in a row, The American Business Awards, the nation’s premier business awards program, recognized Fiksu’s stellar work. We were named a Gold Stevie Winner in the Mobile Marketing Campaign of the Year category for our work on American Well's telehealth app campaign.

By 2017 mobile is predicted to account for nearly three quarters of US digital ad spend, making it one of the most far-reaching and effective platforms to target consumers.

But mobile advertising didn’t arrive overnight. It’s the culmination of years of marketer trial and error, combining advancements in four key areas:

No matter what your goal is on mobile – whether you’re trying to get users to download your app, or raise awareness for your brand – audience targeting is key to achieving success. This typically includes targeting based on key characteristics like who someone is (gender, age, etc.) and what they like (travel, games, sports, etc.).

The much-anticipated Apple Watch is finally here, as early pre-orders have begun to arrive. Already, 3000 apps are available on the device, and 20 million units are predicted to be sold this year. The buzz is clearly at a peak for consumers, as well as marketers, who are eager to find out how they can capitalize on this newest mobile device.

It may not be surprising that 86% of senior-level marketers say it’s absolutely critical or very important to create a cohesive customer journey.

But in 2015, that isn’t quite as easy as it may have once been. As our new ebook describes, the customer journey in general, and more specifically how marketers track it, has gotten significantly more complicated.

The fact that programmatic buying is growing like crazy is not news. And neither is the notion that some marketers are leery of giving up control over their media buying to a computer. But I'm here to try and ease those concerns, specifically around the most popular type of programmatic buying: RTB.

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