Two years ago, Facebook threw a karate chop to the gut of the mobile marketing industry by creating revolutionary tools for mobile app marketers. Yesterday, Google responded with a one-two punch of its own, addressing both the demand side and supply side of the market.

This week, Google is rolling out some changes to their search behavior that could make waves for app developers. First, you've probably heard about the update to their page rank algorithm that gives more credit to sites that have a mobile friendly design, ranking them higher on mobile search results. The changes -- referred to as "Mobilegeddon" by some in the SEO industry -- reward web pages for such mobile-friendly practices as:

UPDATE: As of about 4:30pm ET, the App Store seems to be working again and Apple's Service page reports that it's running. Back to promoting those apps, everyone -- with an eye on the stability of the app store, just to be safe. Original post below.

Last night, Apple withdrew iOS 8.0.1 after it surfaced that the update was causing problems with cellular connectivity for iPhone 6 users. That's a pretty serious bug -- but it turns out that according to our data, only a very small percentage of users with the new phones had actually upgraded -- and many of them have used Apple's instructions on how to revert to the original iOS 8.0.

Our iOS 8 Activity Tracker is showing real-time iOS 8 events from around the world, illustrating the rapid switch to the new operating system. (Fairly rapid, anyway: not nearly as fast as iOS 7 last year, but still impressive.) The most dramatic images came from the first 24 hours, though, as early adopters rushed to get the new software.

September and October are exciting - and scary - months for app marketers. It’s the season for new Apple devices, and with them a new version of iOS.  When users update their operating system or move to new phones, they often re-evaluate their app choices and clean house on their phones. "What do I delete and what do I keep? Should I look at new apps to install?"

That’s the scary part for app marketers: it’s an easy time to lose a connection with a customer who might not reinstall every app on their phone.    

After weeks of breathless conjecture -- will they introduce a new iPhone? (no!) or home automation? (yes!) -- Apple used yesterday's WWDC keynote to unveil a slew of changes and updates to OS X, iOS, and the App Store, but no new hardware. Instead, the focus of the event was squarely on developers. Yes, new features like improvements to iMessage, family sharing, and OS X to iOS AirDrop are nice updates for consumers.

In the day-to-day excitement and chaos of running a fast-growing technology business, it's sometimes hard to get perspective on where we really fit in the larger community. Because of that, outside perspectives like today's Boston Magazine article on the state of ad tech in Boston are incredibly valuable. 

Most US Apple app developers understand that for every $0.99 purchase on iTunes, they make $0.70, a 70% cut. However, for international sales, that percentage varies due to a few factors

In rapidly evolving industries, uncertainty can be a killer -- so the introduction of the Advertising Identifier (IDFA) with iOS 6 was a welcome relief. The app marketing industry needed a privacy-respecting, industry-standard way to attribute ad performance, and the IDFA seemed like an ideal answer to an unsettled situation.