A Tribute to Steve Jobs

As news of Steve Jobs’ death stopped the nation – and the world – in its tracks this Wednesday, the outpouring of poignant reflections, tributes and farewells was immediate. We dedicate this week’s Fiksu Feed to one of the greatest technology innovators of our time by sharing just a few of the hundreds of thousands of stories and comments that honor his life and legacy. Fiksu owes Steve Jobs a great deal; his vision spawned a vast ecosystem that created jobs, opportunity and creativity. For this and so much more, we are grateful.

“That Steve Jobs was a genius, a giant influence on multiple industries and billions of lives, has been written many times since he retired as Apple's chief executive in August. He was a historical figure on the scale of a Thomas Edison or Henry Ford, and set the mold for many other corporate leaders in many other industries,” writes Wall Street Journal’s Walt Mossberg in The Steve Jobs I Knew.

While You Were Out: Apple’s Years With and Without Steve is a story told through audio commentary and pictures of Jobs’ time at Apple by Sam Grobart of the New York Times.

NYU Professor Joe Peyronnin penned a moving piece for the Huffington Post, titled Steve Jobs: The iRevolution. He writes, “Jobs inspired a whole generation of young entrepreneurs to take chances, to innovate and to pursue their dreams with relentless determination.” Peyronnin goes on to describe Jobs’ uncanny ability to create and market products so beautifully designed and powerfully functional that consumers had to own them.

In his tribute piece, Steve Jobs: The Beginning, 1955 – 1985, Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s Jim Aley paints an endearing picture of Jobs’ early days as a “high school loner who figured out what the world wanted from technology,”

As news of Jobs’ untimely death spread like wildfire, people around the globe began sharing his most memorable quotes. ABC News has 20 of the best, including some of our favorites:

  • "Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes ... the ones who see things differently -- they're not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo. ... You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can't do is ignore them because they change things. ... They push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the people who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do."
  • "It's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them."
  • "Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it."

Jobs’ death became an instant trending topic across social media channels. AdWeek reports that Twitter received a record-breaking 10,000 tweets per second as a result of the news. In fact, the social networking site briefly crashed under the heavy volume, said CNNMoney. Fast Company’s Adam Penenberg shared a moving collection of tweets honoring and remembering him in this Mega, Meta Mashup in Tweets. Here are some of our favorites:

  • “For those of us lucky enough to get to work with him, it’s been an insanely great honor” (@billgates)
  • “Thank you for saving us from mediocrity” (@om)
  • “Some of the fire in the universe dimmed tonight. Steve Jobs, thank you for reminding us all what ambition+imagination can do” (@DianeSawyer)
  • “President Obama: Bold enough to believe he could change the world & talented enough to do it” (@whitehouse)
  • “Turn your iPhone off for an hour, honor Steve Jobs. When you turn it back on, remember how different your life is because of his work” (@thatdrew)

Thank you for inspiring us, Steve. You will be missed.

Search form

Latest from the Twittersphere