Well, considered us surprised.

Despite what seemed like significant anticipation, Apple users did not rush to upgrade to iOS 8 during the first day of availabilty.  In fact, when compared to the number of downloads this time last year, the adoption rate of iOS 8 is lagging more than 50% behind that of iOS 7, specifically 11% to 22.5%.

 

What gives?

Because nothing’s ever simple, it’s most likely a combination of factors, particularly:

You’re not the only one anticipating today’s release of iOS 8. In fact, since Apple’s operating system was made available to the public at 1 pm EST, more than a few have headed over to the notification center,  “read” the terms and agreements, and clicked update. 

You may have read our recent article in VentureBeat highlighting the benefits of using retargeting both before and after users upgrade to iOS8 in the coming days.

September and October are exciting - and scary - months for app marketers. It’s the season for new Apple devices, and with them a new version of iOS.  When users update their operating system or move to new phones, they often re-evaluate their app choices and clean house on their phones. "What do I delete and what do I keep? Should I look at new apps to install?"

That’s the scary part for app marketers: it’s an easy time to lose a connection with a customer who might not reinstall every app on their phone.    

A common mistake many marketers make is testing a mobile ad network and immediately pausing when initial numbers are poor.  Yes, it’s concerning to see CPIs above the target, but if un-optimized mobile traffic were efficient, there would be no barrier to entry.

There are more than 2.3 billion active mobile-broadband subscriptions across the world, and understanding regional similarities and differences is essential to extending mobile marketing success across borders. We recently interviewed three of Fiksu's international experts to talk about the challenges of the global mobile market – videos are below.

Last week, Google joined the ranks of fellow tech giants Facebook and Twitter by introducing dedicated mobile app install ads for Google Search and Youtube.   Of particular note in the company’s announcement was an emphasis on deep linking.

Have you gone for a hike in the mountains this summer? Well, then you’re following in similar footsteps as app marketing costs – which have continued to climb in July’s Index. The Cost Per Loyal User (CPLU) Index, which measures the cost of acquiring a loyal user for brands who proactively market their apps, came in at $1.97. This represents a 9 percent increase year-over-year and the second-highest peak in the four year-history of the Fiksu Indexes.

2014 was a watershed year for mobile. For the first time, consumers used smartphones and tablets more—194 minutes per day—than laptops/desktops (103 minutes) and television (147 minutes).  And when you consider that mobile devices are only growing in popularity, it’s a safe bet that this difference in media consumption will continue to widen.   In our latest ebook, Bridging the Desktop/Mobile Divide, we examine how app marketers can capitalize on this shift in device preference.

Within the past few weeks, both Google and Facebook announced major changes to how games with in-app purchases (IAPs) can be advertised on their networks. Google will instate several new policies by the end of September, including:

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